Monkeypox is not a new disease and there have been outbreaks of Monkeypox before in many countries, notably in The US in 2003. At that time, this was carried by small animals and children and family members were affected, not MSM or Skin to Skin lesions (see https://www.cdc.gov/poxvirus/monkeypox/outbreak/us-outbreaks.html)

Why is it that Monkeypox has reached PHEIC (public health emergency of international concern) in 2022, two years into the covid19 pandemic?

Also, according to the map you presented (also the data from where the map was drawn), African continent has remained pretty much at their endemic level, but the viral infection is spreading elsewhere relatively rapidly.

There are several unanswered questions about this outbreak that needs resolution. While there is some evidence that the virus does spread by aerosol and possibly fomites, whether or not that is the dominant mode of transmission, the jury is still out. Admittedly there would be far more cases of MPXV if aerosol and droplets were the dominant modes of transmission, but it is also true that the case numbers are rising in the limited number of countries where it is spreading, and several instances of community transmission have been reported. Which _do_ point to a mode of spread _other_ than skin-skin/lesion-human based transmission.

Finally, modelling contact tracing on Covid19 will be dangerous in this outbreak, so more people for contact tracing may not be such a good idea compared with better trained and engaging specific groups within countries with skills to speak with known people at risk. MPXV outbreak is _different_ from COVID19, I am reluctant to comment whether it is less or more. These things are tricky.

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Professor @ University of Canterbury, Doctor, scholar, data scientist, Cantabrian. ENS: arinbasu.eth & mastodon instance: @arin_basu@mastodon.nzoss.nz

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Arindam Basu

Arindam Basu

Professor @ University of Canterbury, Doctor, scholar, data scientist, Cantabrian. ENS: arinbasu.eth & mastodon instance: @arin_basu@mastodon.nzoss.nz