Tiffin is an English word of British origin, not Indian-English as you claim. See https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/aug/17/tiffin-the-history-of-indias-lunch-in-a-box-mumbai,

“How tiffin came about

When the British established themselves in India in the late 18th century, it soon became clear that adaptation was needed. For a start, the rituals of eating were going to have to change to accommodate the hot, languid days and nights. In the heat of the day lunch became a much lighter meal – but what to call it? Somehow, the word that seemed to stick was “tiffin”, taken from the slang words “tiff”, a tot of diluted liquor, and “tiffing”, to take a sip of this liquor (perhaps a hint that a sahib’s lunch might quite often be of the liquid variety!). Tiffin took off and “a spot of tiffin” soon became a peg on which almost any culinary indulgence between breakfast and dinner could be hung.”

Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Environmental Health at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. Also in: https://refind.com/arinbasu

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